Cantaloupe Ice Snacks

We’re nearing the end of summer, as back-to-school specials hit store shelves and hints of fall start creeping into farmer’s markets. I already felt some chilly air this morning when Ira and I went for our morning walk around the block. It’s a time of year I both love and hate. Summer’s bounty of fruits and vegetables will soon be coming to a close, which means much less preserving in the fall. But the plus side is that I love fall weather, pumpkin and apple picking are on the horizon, and hosting a dinner party doesn’t include sweating through endless amounts of clothing. Plus my outfits are way cuter in the fall. I live for the first cool days of fall when you can open up all the windows, and let the stagnant air of summer escape, while inviting the smell of oak and crisp leaves in.

But before it gets too chilly and melons go into hibernation, I thought I’d make some cantaloupe ice pops to help you keep cool through the next few weeks. The flavor is hard to beat—sweet and smooth, with the tiniest touch of salt. It’s quickly becoming my new favorite dessert.

A usual evening in the Simone-Colon household (when we’re not crazy busy) consists of catching up on DVR’d TV shows and eating some sort of sweet treat. I’m a huge ice cream fan, but Alex can take it or leave it, so most often we stock our freezer with “ice snacks.” The term ice snack started as a joke, used as part of an oft-repeated routine to describe a friend’s particularly Neanderthal-like ex-boyfriend. But somehow, like many jokes you repeat too many times, the term ice snack stuck and can be seen on our weekly grocery lists. You can laugh, but it actually works out pretty well since it covers all bases—ice cream, ice pops, Italian ices, etc. We mostly use it to refer to ice pops. Just remember you heard it here, folks.

Truth is, anyone can make ice pops. There are no cooking skills necessary, which make it a great project to do with children. They’re also a great plan-ahead dessert for summertime dinner parties. You only need two special kitchen gadgets to get these ice pops going: a blender, and ice pop molds. As for the blender, you can easily substitute a stick blender if you don’t have a standard countertop blender, or perhaps even a food mill. Basically you just need something to puree your cantaloupe.

As far as ice pop molds go, you can get really crafty with this. I love simplicity, so I recently purchased the Norpro Ice Pop Maker from Amazon and am totally in love with the way the pops look—straightforward and classic. It also works really well, and is super cheap. However, you are free to go as wild and crazy with your ice pop molds as you’d like, since there are so many different shapes and sizes out there. Or, if you want to get crafty, you can always use ice cube trays, shot glasses, juice cups, or ¼-pint canning jars. The options are endless…

This recipe is adapted from Fany Gerson’s book, Paletas: Authentic Recipes for Mexican Ice Pops, Shaved Ice & Aguas Frescas, which is absolutely fabulous! She has some really awesome flavor combinations that make my taste buds super excited. I strongly recommend it if you’re looking to get into ice pop making. Another great book is Pops! By Krystina Castella, if you want an additional source for inspiration.

Cantaloupe Ice Snacks:

What You’ll Need:

1/2 C. Water
1/2 C. Sugar
4 C. chopped cantaloupe (about 1 small mellon)
1 Tbsp fresh squeezed lemon juice
Pinch of salt

Begin by making a simple syrup in a small pan by combining water and sugar. Bring to a boil and stir until all the sugar is dissolved. Let cool to room temperature.

Once the syrup is cooled, place remaining ingredients into a food processor and blend until completely smooth.

Divide the mixture among your ice pop molds and place in the freezer for 1-2 hours. This should make them firm enough to place your popsicle sticks into the ices. Place back into the freezer, and let chill for 4-5 hours. To remove ice pops, dip molds in warm water and freeze in a ziplock bag.

Note: You will find that you have extra cantaloupe mixture–place it in a half pint ball jar, for a mammoth ice pop when you’re really looking to chill out.

Advertisements

1 Response to “Cantaloupe Ice Snacks”


  1. 1 caroline August 26, 2011 at 7:15 pm

    oh my…


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Join 158 other followers

Favorite Reader Posts

Follow Me On Twitter!


%d bloggers like this: